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Prior engagement: Hunt to miss World Cup game for wedding

As a chastened Josh Dugan vowed to lock himself away on days off, one of his Australian teammates revealed he planned to run off to Byron Bay one game-day during the World Cup.
Nanjing Night Net

The Australians gathered in Brisbane on Wednesday ahead of a weekend trial against Fiji and Papua New Guinea at Suva’s ANZ Stadium, with an errant Dugan assuring the media there would be no repeat of the NSW north-coast drinking session with Blake Ferguson during State of Origin that reportedly played a role in coach Laurie Daley’s sacking.

But across the room, halfback Ben Hunt was explaining to Fairfax Media why he’d be in the very same area while the green-and-golds take on France at GIO Stadium on November 3.

“I’ve got a wedding on … my wedding,” he said. “Third of November. Bridget is my fiance, we’ve been together a few years and we’ve got a little boy, Brady. We’re getting married down at Byron.

“I had to ask Mal [Meninga] about it last week. It’s the day we play France. I asked if I could have it off.

“He’s been excellent Mal, he’s really understanding for me to go and get married. [Teammates] Matt Gillett and Josh McGuire, they were invited.

“Josh McGuire knocked back his own brother’s wedding so I don’t think he’d be coming to mine. There’s a few boys who had to pull out but there’s no one in the bridal party who had to pull out so it’s all good.”

The rather seismic scheduling clash is compelling evidence of how little chance Hunt, 27, thought he had of making Australia’s squad for the 14-team tournament, to be held in Australia, New Zealand and Papua New Guinea, starting on October 27.

He joins St George Illawarra next year and thought he’d be moving to Wollongong rather than travelling around Australia and the Pacific for the World Cup as Cameron Smith’s back-up hooker over the next two months.

“We had it all planned for the next week or so, the big move. Then the camp happened and that all changed,” Hunt said.

“To be honest, with the year … I played a bit of Queensland Cup through the year so I wasn’t really thinking about playing for Australia.”

The ARL Commission is flying the families of the Australian squad to Fiji for the weekend, where the players will take on Samoa for 40 minutes and PNG for 40 minutes.

Asked if he would be out and about during the World Cup, Cronulla signing Dugan said at the Brisbane Sofitel: “Definitely not. Days off will be spent in bed.

“I was a bit surprised by my selection to be honest … but Mal has shown faith in me and now I don’t want to let him down. It’s massive and pretty humbling having someone of the stature of Mal to back me.”

Meanwhile, Newcastle have defended the decision to pull Samoans Sione Matautia and Tautau Moga out of the island nation’s World Cup side.

Matautia was asked to stand down after several incidents of concussion this year while Moga is changing clubs from Brisbane and had shoulder surgery.

“With Sione it was basically advice after we sent him to see Dr Paul McCrory in Melbourne – who is the No.1 expert in this field,” Knights high-performance manager Tony Ayoub said.

“He had some tests and the doctor said there was a very minor bit of doubt there with regard to him resuming contact. There is no ongoing problem, he isn’t suffering memory loss or headaches or anything like that.

“But with concussion, it’s a fast-developing field. How long do you need? Sione wanted to play in the World Cup but our advice to him after seeing the doctor was that it was in his best interests if he didn’t.”

Ayoub said there was no connection between the decision on Matautia and the legal action taken by Scottish winger James McManus over head knocks received while at the same club.

“Never discussed,” he said. “In the case of Tautau, he needed a shoulder clean-out. There was some talk of him having it after the World Cup but then there was the risk it would have an impact early next year. He’s at a new club, he’s starting again.”

Ayoub admitted there was always a conflict between the importance of representative football and the interest of clubs.

“There is some robust conversation, I can tell you,” he said. “But the Knights do want our players to play rep football and we do know what a big honour the World Cup is for our players.”

He said the club played no part in new recruit Aiden Guerra’s decision not to play for Italy.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

‘If you cop one, so be it’: Klemmer ready for fists to fly

You don’t have to remind David Klemmer that international rugby league remains a different beast to the NRL when it comes to fisticuffs.
Nanjing Night Net

Klemmer was the man on the end of a nasty right hand from Sam Burgess in last year’s Four Nations tournament, with the England captain opening a cut over Klemmer’s eye during Australia’s 36-18 victory at London’s Olympic Stadium.

The big Australian didn’t have the chance to retaliate as players kept them apart but with rules for the Rugby League World Cup more lax than the NRL, where Klemmer plays for the Canterbury Bulldogs, a few jabs here and there may well be on the cards.

That presents an intriguing dilemma, especially for enforcers like Klemmer, who are tasked with going head-to-head with opponents such as Burgess and owning the middle of the park for their respective sides.

Burgess remained on the field after clocking Klemmer and World Cup referees will be able to use their judgment when it comes to incidents of striking, with the sin bin not automatically in play during the tournament.

Klemmer said nobody was going out looking to start fights but if a spark turned into a fire on the field, so be it.

“It’s always been part of it, even though the rules were changed. I copped a couple last year … Sam Burgess got me,” Klemmer said.

“It gets a bit heated. It’s grown men playing at 100 miles per hour, there’s a lot of emotion going through it. You’re representing your country.

“Everyone enjoys it. If you cop one, so be it. Everyone stays mates after the game.”

Since former NRL boss Dave Smith introduced mandatory sin bins for striking four years ago in the wake of Paul Gallen’s short-lived bout with Nate Myles in State of Origin, fighting has simply vanished from the code in Australia.

The notion of an old-fashioned punch-up would be something of a novelty for local fans, many of whom long for the days when players were able to do more than puff up their chest and posture when things started to get spicy.

Klemmer is hardly a shrinking violet but said overt aggression was a double-edged sword for players, with the media likely to play up the appetite for a biff, then criticise players for taking part.

“It’s the media … they want to see it, then they want to scrutinise you. The media try to get it all going and then scrutinise you. You can’t please everyone. But we’re here to play football. You can’t be worrying about that sort of stuff,” Klemmer said.

“People obviously get frustrated but now they take that out on a big run or a hit. You can definitely feel when someone is fired up. It’s good … that’s how it’s evolved. And I love being a part of that.”

The early rounds will give players and fans an indication of how referees are going to deal with incidents of striking. But if players are given an inch, some may take a mile, in which case the era of the stink could be back for a guest appearance over the spring.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Death of pilot in Antarctica preventable, inquest hears

David Wood was a helicopter pilot in Antarctica Photo: davidwarburtonwood南京夜网
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The man in charge at an Antarctic base when a helicopter pilot died of hypothermia after falling into a crevasse told an inquest on Wednesday he believed the incident was preventable.

Davis station leader William De Bruyn said Captains David Wood and Paul Sutton knew there was a crevasse on the fuel cache site two weeks before Mr Wood fell.

He said that they knew and did not report the crevasse to him or the station’s operations coordinator showed a “carelessness on their part that contributed to this incident.”

Had he known about a crevasse earlier, he would have taken a different course of action towards the cache site, including a consideration of whether to move it, Mr De Bruyn said.

Photographs of the site where David Wood fell into a crevasse from January 11, 2016. Photo: Supplied

“I’m sort of guessing, but I’ve got a feeling it was out of their mind,” he said. “I just think that the pilots forgot it was there.”

The court has heard evidence that when first chosen the surface of the fuel cache site on the western ice shelf was “blue ice”.

But when Mr Wood stepped out of his helicopter on January 11, 2016, the crevasse he fell into was concealed by snow.

Mr Wood and Mr Sutton had landed their helicopters on the site to refuel only two weeks before Mr Wood fell.

Mr Sutton said as they rolled a fuel drum across the ice it crossed a crevasse about a foot wide.

Mr De Bruyn, a former police officer who also investigated Mr Wood’s death under the direction of an ACT coroner, said it was only later that he found out the pilots knew of a crevasse, when Mr Sutton showed him a photo on his phone.

The image hit Mr De Bruyn like “a bolt of lightning”.

Fielding questions from a barrister for Helicopter Resources at the Canberra hearing on Wednesday, Mr De Bruyn said if pilots returned to a site that had been considered safe previously and there was snow on it he would still expect them to land there.

He said pilots landed on fresh snow daily.

He denied suggestions that a visual inspection of a site had limitations, even while conceding a manual said crevasses could be impossible to see and urged caution when relying on previously used sites.

Asked how pilots were ever going to be protected from crevasses at a snow covered area, Mr De Bruyn said: “I have no answer to that.”

Mr De Bruyn said changes made since Mr Wood’s death, where field specialists physically “proved” a site before it was used as a fuel cache, was a start to fixing the problem.

But he said even if a specialist cleared the site it was possible the surface had changed in the time before the next visit.

He said pilots needed better training in what they are looking at and what they are landing on.

In relation to the station’s response to an emergency, he said there was an urgent need for a critical incident recording system, as well as basic emergency management training for staff.

The inquest hearing is scheduled to resume to hear more evidence on December 20 and 21 and for a further three days in the New Year.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Short Takes

I WONDER if the cat that got caught in the fox trap was the cat that killed my chooks? How many native birds and lizards have cats killed while wandering the streets? It’s about time cat owners took responsibility for their pets and kept them on their own property.
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Peter Mathie,MandalongEXTREMELY important for the City of Newcastle! Closing date for submissions for the zoning of the transport corridor is this Monday, October23 at 5pm.Hand delivery at the City Council Administration Building, King Street, Newcastle, or online at the Newcastle City Council website.

Elaine Street,MerewetherWHILE overrated TV cash for comment media types squabble over millions of dollars pay between the sexes, I find it strange that the Fair Work Commission and the Federal Court, who earn mega dollars per week and never work weekends, makes a ruling that low paid workers who work Sundays deserve a pay cut. We are all equal in the eyes of the law? Tell ’em they’re dreaming.

Richard Ryan,Summerland PointMARGARET Priest (Short Takes, 19/10), Hillary Clinton may not have been the best president for the USA but she would have been better than Trump – he has upset everyone.

Colin Geatches,MayfieldTHE only real difference between the East-Enders and the rest of us is that when they want to go down to the local shops to get bread and milk, they will have to make sure that they are going 200km/h by the time they get to the end of their driveway.

Simon Ruddy,NewcastleI WAS wondering, seeing that there is so much progress going on in Newcastle lately, the poor coastguard operators have been shoved aside once again, stuck over in Carrington out of site and out of mind. The obvious place to have them located would be in one of the buildings at Nobbys lighthouse. Surely there is room for them to operate from there as most of the shipping movements are controlled from the harbour nowadays. It is a vital service for our boaties, so why doesn’t the council pull a few strings and try to make this happen? Many coastguard stations along the coast are located right on the water or very close to it. C’mon council, do something positive. And don’t think of the cost involved, it will probably save a life.

Bob Miller,ThorntonTHE POLLSWOULD you consider ditching the car and riding to work?

I already ride to work 34.75%,No. I don’t feel safe on the road 25.53%,No. I live too far away 19.86%,Yes. Maybe once a week 9.93%,Sure. Every day 9.93%DO the Newcastle Jets have a shot at making the finals this season?

Sure do 74.44%,It’s too early to tell 24.06%,No 1.5%DOthe Knights have what it takes to make it to the top 8 next season?

Yes 87.5%,No 6.25%,It’s too early to tell 6.25%

Short Takes

END of an Australian icon –the last Holden rolls off the assembly line today ending the car manufacturing industry along with Ford and Toyota. That $122 million spent on a stupid postal vote would be better spent on the car industry. This Liberal government should hang their heads in shame and get their priorities right.
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Col Page,AdamstownI WRITE in reply to the item by Margaret Priest(Short Takes, 19/10), you’re correct, Hillary Clinton has nobody else but herself to blame for losing the United Statespresidential election. Then again, Donald Trump’s no better in my opinion. It reminds me, back in 1974 they had one president, Gerald Ford. I doubt if that poor man knew what day it was.

David Davies,Blackalls ParkI WOULD like to see how the cost of a new parking spot in Lake Macquarie between $25k and $60k was arrived at. You have got to be joking.

Graeme Bennett,Warners BaySUPERCARS with the active collaboration of our mayor have and are continuing to trash and vandalise our once beautiful city. Foreshore Park now resembles a prison and we are still six weeks away from a three-day race. All we get from Supercars and the council is spin. How have we allowed a private company to do this to us?

John Hudson,Newcastle EastJUST received my NCC newsletter. Having taken an interest in politics for 50 years, I’ve encountered lots of spin, double-talk, deception, exaggeration and misinformation from various politicians but the “blurb” from our Lord Mayor, in describing the upcoming Supercars weekend takes the prize.

Ross Edmonds,WaratahThe NSW governmentspending millions on road and rail and now going to spend millions more on sports arenas. Would you please start thinking about the people and upgrade every hospital in the state first? Our health system needs a complete overhaul.

Barry Spaulding,CardiffHEY Edward Duc and Evelyn King (Herald,19/10) have you both experienced getting around town in a wheelchair? You’re a bit flippant in your remarks. I used to be able to navigate Newcastle, but no more now the train doesn’t go to Newcastle.

Greg Stewart, BeresfieldRICHIE Blanch (Short Takes, 19/10), if you want to win the affection of your new love interest, I can help. I am sure a big juicy rump and a bag of brisket will impress the lovely lady. Personally, an alpaca would be my choice, can’t resist those eyelashes.

Steve Barnett,Fingal BayTHE POLLSSHOULD developers be allowed to build in the rail corridor if it means more jobs will be created?

No 56.1%,Yes 43.9%WHAT does Newcastle need right now more than anything else?

Better public transport 35.62%,More tourism attractions 26.03%,Improved health services 15.07%,More environmentally friendly waste management 9.59%,Better roads 8.22%,More schools 5.48%

Short Takes

REGARDING Wayne Enks’ letter about cyclists (Letters, 21/10): Wait till you’re walking down Memorial Drive at Bar Beach and they go faster than cars. And if you happen to get out on the beach side between Bar and Cliff and they’re going full tilt and have to brake or swerve to miss your door or even you, well lookout for the death stares and abuse that’s coming your way. And yes I do look in the mirrors before I get out.
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Bryn Roberts, New LambtonWATCHING New Zealand’s new Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern giving a press conference was such a refreshing difference to watching our pollies(Nick Xenophon excluded). There was no disrespecting the public by wishy-washy evasive and manipulated answers, leaving those listening no further enlightened. Our mob especially Malcolm should watch and learn how to respect their citizens when answering questions. If they can’t be up front and honest with us, they can’t go crying because people have lost respect for them.

Allan Earl, ThorntonTHE Greens would be rejoicing the end of Holden, they also are hell-bent on the demise of the meat, coal and fishing industries,also recreational angling and hunting. But don’t despair, for I have gazed into my crystal ball and it revealed the millions of jobs lost in the green dream will be replaced. No more butcher or baker for our destiny has chosen the candle stick maker.

Steve Barnett, Fingal BayLIKE the man said, life really wasn’t meant to be easy and though old age might not be that bad, because so many people these days are giving it a go, the bride says not to be confused by any old men you come across who are not grumpy. They’ve just not been paying attention.

Ron Elphick, Buff PointHEAR, Hear, Greg Stewart (Short Takes, 21/10). Nothing beats Newcastle station for people in wheelchairs, it’s that good. Opening onto where there is so much, all on the flat. A place that does not get the basics right is not smart. Newcastle Now? Not really. Inclusiveness should be part of Newcastle’s DNA. Shame.

Graeme Tychsen, Rankin ParkTHE recent speed boat races at the northern end of Lake Macquarie were a huge success and judging buy the crowds, it’s getting bigger each year.The event also highlighted the need for more car parking, especially at Warners Bay. Finding a car park is difficult at the best of times and with all the building going on and more businesses coming to town including Aldi, more parking is essential.There are two vacant blocks of land, one on the corner of King & John St’s the other on the corner of Charles & Lake St’s, the latter has been fenced off. Why can’t these blocks be opened up even if only for “rough parking”.

Neil Meyers, Warners BayTHE POLLSWHAT do you do to chill out after a stressful day?

Meditate 0%,Work out 14.29%,Eat delicious food 14.29%,Take a nap 28.57%,Go for a walk 28.57%,Keep a journal 0%,Talk it out 14.29%

Taking a local perspective on a global leadership issue

LEADER: David Pich says that lessons on global leadership can be found locally.This article is sponsored bythe Instituteof Managers and Leaders.
Nanjing Night Net

As chief executive of apeak Australian leadership body, the one question that I am often asked is; ‘Is there a crisis of leadership in the world today?’

It’s one of those questions that is usually put to me in the hope of producing a pithy soundbite – perhaps about Trump, Brexit or the leaders of some of our local high street banks (feel free to insert your own favourite example of poor leadership here!).

But here’s the thing about what I call ‘the crisis question’; it shows a common mistake that we make when we consider the quality of leadership and today’s leaders. There’s a tendency to ‘think global’.

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It’s understandable, of course. It’s impossible to escape the news about leadership issues around the world. These stories are everywhere, from the television screen to our Twitter feeds. There’s no denying that leadership is a global issue.

But it’s a local issue too.

In my view, if we all spent more time focusing on local leadership issues and local leaders we would see a different perspective on, and get a far more balanced picture of, the current leadership landscape.

For example, I spend time with my two young daughters while they play soccer in the local park on the Saturday morning and I see plenty of great leaders using their leadership skills with the kids (and their parents!) right across the ten or more fields in use.

The gift of listening. The art of negotiation. A positive attitude to problem solving.

These are all important skills that can be used from the playground right up to the boardroom.

There are leadership lessons to be found in the most unlikely of places.

I like to view these – and the many other examples of local leadership – as being the antidote to the seemingly never ending drip feeding of bad news stories.

Of course, I take a keen interest in issues of global leadership too, but sometimes it’s good to look beyond the crises and to celebrate local leadership.

There are lessons to be learnt everywhere.

‘Looking local’ and giving a shout out to someone you know who’s leading well close to home is one of the best strategies in crisis management when it comes to leadership.

David Pich FIML is the chief executive of the Institute of Managers and Leaders (formerly the Australian Institute of Management).

This article is sponsored by the Instituteof Managers and Leaders.

‘Self-promotion’: Advertising campaign to showcase Gladys to the people

The NSW Liberals are preparing an advertising campaign to showcase the government’s infrastructure credentials and lift the profile of Premier Gladys Berejiklian 17 months before the 2019 election.
Nanjing Night Net

The proposed campaign, raised by NSW Liberal state director Chris Stone at a meeting of the party executive on Friday night, is understood to include television ads as well as social media.

It is set to focus on the government’s achievements, but a senior Liberal source said the ads were also designed “to lift Gladys’s profile”.

Plans for the Liberal campaign coincide with new polling that shows Ms Berejiklian has a net favourable rating with NSW voters, but that even after eight months as Premier more than a third remain “neutral” about her and five per cent have never heard of her.

In the ReachTEL poll of 1647 NSW voters commissioned by Fairfax Media 31.1 per cent said they have a favourable opinion of Ms Berejiklian.

A further 25.4 per cent said their opinion is unfavourable, 38.3 per cent said they were neutral and 5.2 per cent said they had never heard of Ms Berejiklian.

Ms Berejiklian is most popular among those aged 65 and over, of which 40.4 per cent returned a favourable response, 19.9 per cent unfavourable and 36.8 per cent neutral.

She is least popular among 18- to 34-year-olds with just 24.6 per cent holding a favourable opinion, while 33.7 per cent said their view was unfavourable and a further 34.9 per cent neutral.

In the same poll, Opposition Leader Luke Foley returned a net negative approval rating, with 27 per cent saying their opinion was negative compared with 23.6 per cent who said it was favourable.

However, 42.9 per cent said their opinion was neutral, while 6.6 per cent said they had never heard of Mr Foley.

Mr Foley is most popular among 18- to 34-year-olds, with 26.4 per cent saying they have a favourable opinion. But even among that age group, 32.3 per cent said their opinion was unfavourable, with 30 per cent remaining neutral.

The campaign comes as the government is spending more than $13 million on “Tomorrow’s Sydney” advertising designed to pacify commuters frustrated by the amount of infrastructure related construction work around the city.

The opposition has slammed the spending on the ads, which are set to run until 2018-19, as government “self promotion”.

Fairfax Media has also revealed the government is spending $2 million on advertising that will run through the 2019 election spruiking the benefits of the $17 billion WestConnex motorway.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Open homesSaturday October 14

Adamstown10.00am – 10.30am | 15 Sixth Street | $660,000 – $720,000 | 4989 4013
Nanjing Night Net

10.00am – 10.30am | 137 Lockyer Street | Auction | 02 4961 6899

10.30am – 11.00am | 38 Fourth Street | $795,000 – $845,000 | 0438 770 427

10.50am – 11.20am | 18 Ella Street | $1,400,000 – $1,500, | 4902 7222

11.00am – 11.30am | 100 Fletcher Street | $625,000 – $655,000 | 0249 260 600

11.00am – 11.30am | 86 Madison Drive | Friendly Auction | 0249 260 600

11.30am – 12.00pm | 2/3 Fourth Street | $680,000-$720,000 | 0411 843 051

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 12 Brisbane Water Road | Auction | 4908 5900

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 114 Garden Grove Parade | $1,000,000 – $1,100, | 0249 260 600

12.45pm – 1.15pm | 17 Regan Street | Price Guide $1,200,0 | 4908 5900

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 43 Belmore Street | Price on request | 4989 4003

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 36 Eighth Street | $665,000 – $735,000 | 4902 7222

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 8 Bailey Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

Adamstown Heights9.00am – 9.30am | 14 Muraban Street | Auction | 4908 5900

11.00am – 11.30am | 45 City Road | $850,000 – $900,000 | 4902 7222

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 7 Madera Close | Auction | 02 4961 6899

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 81 Princeton Avenue | $778,000 | 0411 843 051

12.45pm – 1.15pm | 61 Princeton Avenue | Auction | 02 4961 6899

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 35 Carolyn Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

Anna Bay11.15am – 12.00pm | 2/5 Fitzroy Street | $540,000 – $570,000 | 0423 120 030

Arcadia Vale12.15pm – 12.45pm | 82 Arcadia Street | $649,000 | 4975 1644

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 84 Alexander Parade | $649,000 – $699,000 | 4975 1644

Balmoral10.30am – 11.00am | 33 Hastings Road | $590,000 – $639,000 | 4975 4800

10.30am – 11.00am | 2 Letchworth Parade | $1,049,000 | 4975 4800

11.15am – 11.45am | 1/10 Balmoral Place | $499,000 – $529,000 | 4975 4800

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 91 Letchworth Parade | AUCTION 19.10.17 | 4959 1466

Barnsley10.00am – 10.30am | 68a Thomas Streeet | $395,000 – $430,000 | 0249 260 600

12.45pm – 1.15pm | 17 Nelson Street | $590,000 to $640,000 | 4950 6111

Belmont10.00am – 10.30am | 20 Violet Town Road | EOI | 4945 8600

11.00am – 11.30am | 15 Heron Place | By Neg $940,000 – $9 | 4945 8600

11.00am – 11.30am | 6/12-14 Glover Street | PREVIEW | 0428 131 338

11.30am – 12.00pm | 2 Seafarer Close | Auction | 4945 8600

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 11 Cobbin Parade | Price On Request | 4944 5600

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 9 Tudor Street | Preview | 4915 7888

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 20 Green Point Drive | Auction | 4945 8600

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 38 Crown Street | By Neg $1,270,000 – | 0419 698 908

3.00pm – 3.30pm | 6/30-32 Macquarie Street | By Neg $379,950 – $3 | 4945 8600

Belmont North10.00am – 10.30am | 50 Kananook Crescent | Preview | 4915 7888

11.00am – 11.30am | 39 Kananook Crescent | $670,000-$710,000 | 4915 7888

11.00am – 11.30am | 12 Vista Parade | $695,000-$735,000 | 4915 7888

11.00am – 11.30am | 1/56A Golding Avenue | $390,000-$430,000 | 4915 7888

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 62 John Fisher Road | $790,000 – $840,000 | 4908 5900

Belmont South10.00am – 10.30am | 21 Marriot Street | Preview | 4915 7888

Birmingham Gardens10.00am – 10.30am | 31 Naughton Avenue | $375,000 – $405,000 | 4904 8400

10.30am – 11.00am | 16 Timmins Street | Guide $395,000 | 0418 684 866

Blackalls Park10.00am – 10.30am | 19 Blackall Avenue | Auction | 4950 8555

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 1 Adam Street | $585,000 – $610,000 | 0434 627 080

Bolton Point12.00pm – 12.30pm | 143 Bay Road | $850,000 – $920,000 | 0447 122 113

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 22 Tirabeenba Drive | $385,000 | 4959 1466

Boolaroo4.00pm – 4.30pm | 46 First Street | Guide: $470,000 | 4904 8400

Booragul12.00pm – 12.30pm | 6 Farlow Street | $429,000 | 4959 1677

Brightwaters12.00pm – 12.30pm | 114 Dandaraga Road | $650,000 – $690,000 | 0422 284 151

Broadmeadow11.00am – 11.30am | 12 School Street | Price On Request | 4944 5600

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 153 Everton Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

Buttaba11.00am – 11.30am | 45 Earswick Crescent | $595.000 | 4954 8833

11.00am – 11.30am | 53 Ilford Avenue | AUCTION | 4959 1677

11.00am – 11.30am | 37 Pangela Street | $495,000 – $544,500 | 4975 1644

11.00am – 11.30am | 21 ilford Avenue | $1,195,000 | 4959 1677

11.00am – 11.30am | 100 Clydebank Road | $589.000 | 4954 8833

Cameron Park10.00am – 10.30am | 24 Ayes Avenue | $540,000 – $590,000 | 0249 260 600

10.45am – 11.15am | 16 Billabong Drive | $540,000 to $590,000 | 4955 6900

11.15am – 11.45am | 17 Guilford Grove | $650,000 – $700,000 | 0447 122 113

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 41 Constitution Drive | $580,000 – $620,000 | 4950 8555

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 38 Floresta Crescent | $775,000 – $845,000 | 0249 260 600

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 31 Tenyo Street | $537,000 | 4950 8555

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 12 Finch Street | $490,000 – $530,000 | 4908 5900

2.30pm – 3.00pm | 19 Flamingo Drive | $520,000 – $570,00 | 4950 8555

2.45pm – 3.15pm | 2 Lakeaire Circuit | $590,000 – $640,000 | 4950 8555

Cardiff10.30am – 11.00am | 5 Davies Street | $595,000 – $650,000 | 0447 122 113

11.45am – 12.15pm | 45 Lawson Road | $850,000 – $920,000 | 0411 295 991

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 5 Park Street | $489,000 – $535,000 | 4954 7447

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 27 Queens Avenue | $470,000 – $510,000 | 0411 295 991

Cardiff South10.00am – 10.30am | 8 Sophia Court | Auction | 4902 7222

11.00am – 11.30am | 5/3 Francis | $349,950 | 4943 6333

Carey Bay11.15am – 11.45am | 6 Exeter Street | $890,000 – $965,000 | 4959 8667

Carrington11.30am – 11.55am | 73 Bourke Street | $659,950 | 4908 5900

1.00pm – 1.45pm | 94 Young Street | AUCTION | 4960 0499

Caves Beach10.00am – 10.30am | 33 Scenic Drive | Auction | 4945 8600

Charlestown10.00am – 10.30am | 411a Warners Bay Road | Guide: $700,000 | 4904 8400

10.00am – 10.30am | 71 Roslyn Avenue | $689,000 | 0410 545 947

10.00am – 10.30am | 46 Park Street | Price On Request | 4902 7222

11.00am – 11.30am | 24 Pillapai Street | $620,000 – $670,000 | 4904 8400

11.00am – 11.30am | 69 Roslyn Avenue | $586,000 | 4908 5900

11.00am – 11.30am | 13 Wales Street | Auction | 4904 8400

11.00am – 11.30am | 58 Alexander Parade | Preview | 4915 7888

11.15am – 11.45am | 4 Birkwood Close | $684,000 | 0418 685 955

11.30am – 12.00pm | 49 Gari St | Guide on request | 4910 0692

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 5/260 Pacific Highway | Guide: $500,000 | 4904 8400

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 43 Arnold Street | Expres. of Interest | 4904 8400

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 12 Kalora Crescent | Preview | 4915 7888

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 66 Jennifer St | $675,000-$725,000 | 4910 0692

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 8/29 Edward Street | $526,000 | 4908 5900

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 63 Felton Street | $629,950 | 4908 5900

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 104 Pacific Highway | $479,950 | 4943 6333

2.30pm – 3.00pm | 11a Dickinson Street | $589,000 – $639,000 | 4915 3800

Coal Point10.00am – 10.30am | 6 Ellis Close | $745,000 – $795,000 | 0478 164 220

10.30am – 11.00am | 247 – 249 Coal Point Road | $1,700,000-$1,800,00 | 0428 482 767

10.45am – 11.15am | 1 Killara Close | $749,000 | 0478 164 220

11.00am – 11.30am | 42 Coal Point Road | $749,000 – $769,000 | 4959 1466

11.30am – 12.00pm | 14 Skye Point Road | $589,000 | 4959 1466

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 252 Coal Point Road | $485,000 | 4959 1677

Cooks Hill8.30am – 9.00am | 1/17 Dawson Street | AUCTION TODAY | 4928 7400

9.00am – 10.00am | 49 Railway Street | Auction | 02 4961 6899

10.45am – 11.15am | 22/215 Darby Street | Auction | 02 4961 6899

11.45am – 12.15pm | 128 Dawson Street | Auction 28 Oct 10:30 | 0418 682 377

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 3/90 Brooks Street | 575K-625K | 4944 5600

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 3/84 Darby Street | $750,000 – $795,000 | 0249 260 600

12.45pm – 1.15pm | 7/26 Brooks Street | $575,000-$600,000 | 0418 682 377

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 98 Bull Street | Auction 11 Nov 3pm | 0412 680 584

1.15pm – 1.45pm | 12/58 Parry Street | $595,000 | 0418 684 866

Cooranbong10.00am – 10.30am | 26 Yango Street | $605,000 – $625,000 | 0428 826 153

11.00am – 11.30am | 46 Avondale Road | $625,000 | $625,000

11.45am – 12.15pm | 411 Freemans Drive | $460,000 – $480,000 | 4959 8667

Dora Creek11.00am – 11.30am | 90 Baker Street | $760,000 – $795,000 | 4959 8667

11.30am – 12.15pm | 170 Dora Street | Auction | (02) 4975 4499

1.15pm – 1.45pm | 17 Coorumbung Road | $649,000 – $689,000 | 4959 1466

Dudley10.00am – 10.30am | 15 Lyndhurst Street | Preview | 4908 5900

10.00am – 10.30am | 6 George Street | Auction | 4908 5900

11.00am – 11.30am | 7 Albury Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

Edgeworth9.00am – 9.30am | 3 Gordonia Close | $470,000 – $510,000 | 4950 8555

9.45am – 10.15am | 796 Main Road | $330,000 – $360,000 | 4959 1466

11.00am – 11.30am | 71a Minmi Road | $430,000 to $470,000 | 4950 6111

11.00am – 11.45am | 31 Palisade Street | $770,000 – $830,000 | 0249 260 600

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 15 Nott Street | $380,000 – $415,000 | 0439 616 851

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 60 Transfield Avenue | $490,000 to $530,000 | 4950 6111

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 21 Irving Street | $300,000 – $330,000 | 4950 8555

Eleebana10.00am – 10.30am | 93 Burton Road | $820,000 – $860,000 | 4915 3800

10.00am – 10.30am | 11 Moani Street | $550,000 – $600,000 | 4989 4011

10.00am – 10.30am | 6 Hermitage Close | $740,000 | 4944 5600

10.30am – 11.00am | 34 Moani Street | $670K – $737K | 4944 5600

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 15a Cherry Road | Price On Request | 4944 5600

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 93 Burton Road | $820,000 – $860,000 | 4915 3800

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 20 Desreaux Close | AUCTION 02.11.17 | 4915 3800

Elermore Vale10.45am – 11.15am | 6/151 Lake Road | $320,000 to $355,000 | 4950 6111

11.00am – 11.30am | View plans 443 Hunter St | $414,000-$424,000 | 0402 411 317

11.00am – 11.30am | 11 Franciska Close | $835,000 – $865,000 | 4943 6333

11.00am – 11.30am | 5 Ceres Close | Preview | 4908 5900

11.45am – 12.15pm | 89 Croudace Road | $600,000 to $650,000 | 4955 6900

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 5 Orion Close | $600,000 – $650,000 | 4943 6333

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 10/164-166 Croudace Rd | Guide on Request | 4929 5999

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 1/157 Lake Road | $595,000-$649,000 | 0409 099 991

Fassifern1.00pm – 1.30pm | 8 Lake Street | $569,000 | 4959 8667

Fern Bay10.30am – 11.00am | 18 Sandcastle Street | $580,000 – $630,000 | 4902 7222

11.00am – 11.30am | 6 Rosemary Street | Price On Request | 4902 7222

12.45pm – 1.15pm | 19 Paperbark Court | Auction | 4955 6900

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 73 Seaside Boulevard | $570,000 – $620,000 | 4989 4002

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 7 Diuris Street | $595,000 – $630,000 | 0249 260 600

Fishing Point10.00am – 10.30am | 39 Alkrington Avenue | $675,000 – $740,000 | 0422 133 066

11.00am – 11.30am | 132a Fishing Point Road | $749,000 | 4959 1466

Fletcher9.30am – 10.00am | 9 Brookfield Avenue | $550,000 – $565,000 | 4989 4021

10.15am – 10.45am | 7 Piroma Street | $690,000 – $730,000 | 4989 4021

11.00am – 11.30am | 32 Brookfield Avenue | $620,000 – $680,000 | 0249 260 600

11.30am – 12.00pm | 10 Thistle Way | $799,000 | 0423 375 591

3.00pm – 3.30pm | 26 Awabakal Drive | $665,000 – $715,000 | 4902 7222

Floraville12.00pm – 12.30pm | 36 Imperial Close | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 63 Marlin Avenue | EOI | 4945 8600

Fullerton Cove11.00am – 4.00pm | The Cove Village | Contact Agent | 4908 5900

Garden Suburb11.00am – 11.30am | 118 Prospect Road | $498,000 – $528,000 | 0413 452 297

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 99 Prospect Road | $699,950 | 4908 5900

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 18 Sundew Close | Auction | 4904 8400

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 14 Whitegum Way | $715,000 – $785,000 | 4954 7447

Georgetown2.00pm – 2.30pm | 70 Christo Road | Auction | 0408 525 362

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 2 Hunter Street | $660,000-$710,000 | 0418 682 377

Glendale11.30am – 12.00pm | 302 Lake Road | Auction 4/11/17 | 4950 6111

Hamilton11.30am – 12.00pm | 108 Denison Street | Guide $820,000 | 0249 260 600

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 201 Denison Street | Auction | 02 4961 6899

Hamilton North12.00pm – 12.30pm | 257 Beaumont Street | $830,000 – $880,000 | 02 4961 6899

Hamilton South11.00am – 11.30am | 158 Parkway Avenue | Auction | 4902 7222

11.45am – 12.30pm | 25 Harle Street | Auction | 4908 5900

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 2/28 Churchill Circuit | $540,000 – $580,000 | 4904 8400

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 3/422 Glebe Road | $540,000 – $580,000 | 02 4961 6899

2.15pm – 2.45pm | 200 Kemp Street | $1.15mil – $1.25mil | 02 4961 6899

3.00pm – 3.30pm | 118 Gordon Avenue | Auction | 02 4961 6899

Highfields11.00am – 11.30am | 33a George Street | $800,000K | 4944 5600

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 6 Valaud Crescent | $780,000 – $825,000 | 0438 770 427

Hillsborough11.00am – 11.30am | 41 King Street | Preview | 4908 5900

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 7 Royton Street | $550,000 – $600,000 | 4904 8400

Holmesville12.00pm – 12.30pm | 2 Tunanda Close | $460,000 – $500,000 | 4950 8555

Islington10.00am – 10.30am | 12/22 Milford Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

10.00am – 10.30am | 50 Fern Street | $619,950 | 4908 5900

11.00am – 11.30am | 319/14 Milford Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

Jesmond10.00am – 10.30am | 4 Hill Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

10.30am – 11.00am | 78 Michael Street | $475,000 | 4961 5181

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 1/3 Harvard Close | $370,000 – $390,000 | 0249 260 600

Jewells11.00am – 11.30am | 4 Sharon Avenue | $740,000 – $790,000 | 4904 8400

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 16 Mathew Avenue | $640,000-$680,000 | 4915 7888

Kahibah10.00am – 10.30am | 39 Beath Crescent | Auction | 4908 5900

Kilaben Bay10.45am – 11.15am | 3 South Street | AUCTION 19.10.17 | 4959 1466

Kotara10.00am – 10.30am | 175 Park Avenue | AUCTION 02.11.17 | 4915 3800

10.00am – 10.30am | 50 Grayson Avenue | Guide: $675,000 | 4904 8400

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 4 Gregory Parade | $795,000 – $874,500 | 4902 7222

Kotara South10.00am – 10.30am | 61 Blackbutt Parade | $490,000 – $525,000 | 4904 8400

Lakelands3.00pm – 3.30pm | 7/115 Ambleside Circuit | Guide: $425,000 | 4904 8400

Lambton10.00am – 10.30am | 142 Elder Street | Guide $725,000 | 0249 260 600

10.00am – 10.30am | 7/22 Karoola Road | $460,000 – $490,000 | 4904 8400

10.00am – 10.30am | 90 Womboin Road | AUCTION | 0411 843 051

11.00am – 11.30am | 2a Durham Road | $760,000 – $795,000 | 0410 545 947

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 37 Durham Road | $850,000 – $900,000 | 4957 6166

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 4/35 Robinson Avenue | $429,950 | 4943 6333

Macquarie Hills10.00am – 10.30am | 9 Ventura Pace | $450,000 – $490,000 | 0249 260 600

10.00am – 10.30am | 153 Macquarie Road | AUCTION 19.10.17 | 4915 3800

11.00am – 11.30am | 100 Lawson Road | $470,000 – $515,000 | 0411 295 991

11.30am – 12.00pm | 4 Ripon Way | $740,000-$770,000 | 0410 312 281

12.15pm – 12.45pm | 90 Delaware Drive | PREVIEW | 4928 7400

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 2 Kuraman Close | $619,950 | 4908 5900

Marks Point9.00am – 9.30am | 1/25-31 Haddon Crescent | EOI | 4945 8600

Marmong Point12.45pm – 1.15pm | 6 Courageous Close | $495,000 – $540,000 | 0411 295 991

Maryland9.00am – 9.30am | 11a Wibbi Street | $475,000 to $515,000 | 4955 6900

10.00am – 10.30am | 132 Callan Ave | $450,000-$470,000 | 4910 0692

10.00am – 10.30am | 7 Kiara Close | $440,000 to $480,000 | 4955 6900

10.15am – 10.45am | 9 Koombool Avenue | $570,000 | 4928 7400

11.00am – 11.30am | 156 Maryland Drive | $440,000 – $470,000 | 4989 4021

11.00am – 11.45am | 44 Berwick Crescent | PREVIEW | 4928 7400

12.15pm – 12.45pm | 36 Callan Avenue | PREVIEW | 4928 7400

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 46 Callan Avenue | PREVIEW | 4928 7400

Maryville10.30am – 11.00am | 29 Downie Street | Auction | 02 4961 6899

11.00am – 11.30am | 5/10 The Lane | $850,000 – $920,000 | 4954 7447

11.00am – 11.30am | 72 McMichael Street | Price on request | 4989 4002

12.15pm – 12.45pm | 12/14 The Lane | Preview | 4908 5900

Mayfield9.30am – 10.00am | 162 Crebert Street | Guide $675,000 | 0407 826 391

10.00am – 10.30am | 110 Elizabeth Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

10.00am – 10.30am | 52 Avon Street | Preview | 4908 5900

11.00am – 11.30am | 3 Simpson Court | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

11.00am – 11.30am | 3/37 Gamack Street | $450,000 | 4908 5900

11.00am – 11.45am | 20 Villiers Street | $649,000-$710,000 | 4960 0499

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 16 George Street | $580,000 – $599,000 | 0402 009 532

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 20 Cross Street | $630,000-$670,000 | 0425 278 850

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 33 Fawcett Street | Preview | 4908 5900

1.15pm – 1.45pm | 100 Crebert Street | Friendly Auction | 0249 260 600

Mayfield East11.30am – 12.00pm | 43/29 Arthur Street | $395,000 – $410,000 | 0413 209 505

11.30am – 12.00pm | 22 Smith Street | $680.000 – $740,000 | 4954 8833

Mayfield West9.45am – 10.15am | 1 Adrian Street | $560,000 | 4908 5900

11.00am – 11.30am | 1 Werribi Street | $435,000-$475,000 | 4960 0499

12.15pm – 1.00pm | 3 Shelley Close | $680,000-$740,000 | 4960 0499

Merewether9.00am – 9.30am | 2/15 Lingard Street | $690,000 – $750,000 | 0413 209 500

10.00am – 10.30am | 4/83 Mitchell Street | Auction | 4929 5999

10.00am – 10.30am | 74 Selwyn Street | $750,000 | 4989 4003

10.00am – 10.30am | 14 Mary Street | Auction | 02 4961 6899

11.00am – 11.15am | 173 Morgan Street | $940,000 | 4989 4003

11.00am – 11.30am | 5/13 Selwyn Street | $645,000 | 4989 4013

11.30am – 12.00pm | 2 Henry Street | Auction 4 Nov 1:30pm | 0418 684 866

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 15/22 Patrick Street | Price on request | 4989 4013

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 11 Cedar Crescent | Price on request | 4989 4003

12.15pm – 12.45pm | 99 Kenrick Street | Auction 4 Nov 12pm | 0418 684 866

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 114 Janet Street | Auction | 4902 7222

12.50pm – 1.20pm | 61 Yule Road | Auction | 4902 7222

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 3 Hugh Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 1/28 Kilgour Avenue | AUCTION | 0423 375 591

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 12 Wilton Street | Price On Request | 4944 5600

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 112a Janet Street | $1,450,000 – $1,500, | 0249 260 600

4.00pm – 4.30pm | 6 Livingstone Street | Auction | 02 4961 6899

Merewether Heights11.40am – 12.10pm | 14 The Grove | Auction | 4902 7222

Mount Hutton10.00am – 10.30am | 9 Plumridge Close | $775,000 – $850,000 | 0422 133 066

11.30am – 12.00pm | 1 Roscrea Crescent | $500,000 – $550,000 | 0422 133 066

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 6/62 Tennent Road | $370,000 – $385,000 | 0410 545 947

2.30pm – 3.00pm | 45 Auklet Road | $850,000 – $920,000 | 4908 5900

Newcastle10.15am – 10.45am | 8/18 Brown Street | $315,000 – $339,000 | 0402 009 532

10.30am – 11.00am | 804/10 Worth Place | $849,000 – $879,000 | 0249 260 600

11.00am – 11.30am | 405/8 King Street | Guide $695,000 | 0249 260 600

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 51 Perkins Street | Auction 21 Oct 11am | 0412 680 584

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 904/10 Worth Place | $870,000 – $950,000 | 4902 7222

12.15pm – 12.45pm | 610/10 Worth Place | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 1/71 Scott Street | $690,000-$740,000 | 0417 030 301

Newcastle West10.15am – 10.45am | 111/569 Hunter Street | $260,000 – $269,000 | 4902 7222

New Lambton10.00am – 10.30am | 86 Orchardtown Road | $650,000 – $715,000 | 4989 4008

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 18 Bridges Road | $540,000 to $590,000 | 0418689815

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 1 Sturdee Street | Auction | 4902 7222

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 34 Aldyth Street | $1,200,000-$1,300,00 | 4989 4008

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 1/101 Victoria Street | $550,000 – $595,000 | 4957 6166

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 180 Bridges Road | $465,000 – $510,000 | 4989 4008

4.00pm – 4.30pm | 19 Poitrel Street | Auction | 4950 8555

New Lambton Heights11.00am – 11.30am | 196 Croudace Street | $1,200,000 – $1,290, | 0249 260 600

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 64 Grandview Road | $670,000 – $720,000 | 4904 8400

North Lambton10.00am – 10.30am | 60 Dent Street | Advanced Showing | 4908 5900

10.00am – 10.45am | 48 Spruce Street | Auction | 02 4961 6899

10.45am – 11.15am | 3 Noble Street | Auction | 4908 5900

11.00am – 11.30am | 28 Dent Street | $620-$660,000 | 0412352490

11.00am – 11.30am | 27 Dent Street | $565,000 – $580,000 | 4957 6166

11.30am – 12.00pm | View plans 443 Hunter St | $345,000-$365,000 | 0402 411 317

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 18 Lester Parade | $580,000 – $630,000 | 0249 260 600

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 21 Faulkner Crescent | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

Pelaw Main2.15pm – 3.00pm | 29 Millfield Street | AUCTION | 4928 7400

Rankin Park11.00am – 11.30am | 23 Cheshire Close | $640,000 to $680,000 | 4955 6900

Rathmines9.30am – 10.00am | 67a Harborne Avenue | $429,000 – $449,000 | 4975 4800

10.30am – 11.00am | 19 Northminster Way | $775,000 | 4959 1677

11.15am – 11.45am | 68 Rosemary Row | $529,000 – $549,000 | 4975 4800

11.30am – 12.00pm | 21 Hampstead Way | $495,000 – $535,000 | 4959 8667

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 26 Overhill Road | $529,000 | 4975 4800

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 5 Sunlight Parade | AUCTION 02.11.17 | 4975 4800

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 44 Northview Street | $499,000 – $529,000 | 4975 4800

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 29 Northminster Way | $700,000 – $750,000 | 4975 4800

Redhead2.00pm – 2.30pm | 6 Elsdon Street | $700,000-$750,000 | 4915 7888

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 39 Brown Street | $890,000 – $979,000 | 4908 5900

Shortland9.15am – 9.45am | 23/49 Mawson Street | $440,000 – $480,000 | 0249 260 600

9.30am – 10.00am | 1/285 Sandgate Road | Price On Request | 4902 7222

11.00am – 11.30am | 6/2 Conmurra Circuit | $489,950 | 4908 5900

Speers Point11.00am – 11.30am | 10/43 Berkeley Street | $549,000 | 4915 3800

11.00am – 11.45am | 28 Bell Street | PREVIEW | 4928 7400

11.00am – 11.30am | 24 Speers Street | $660,000 – $699,000 | 4908 5900

11.30am – 12.00pm | 1 Braye Street | $680,000 – $745,000 | 0426 108 731

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 33 Barfod Street | Guide $700,000 | 0249 260 600

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 240 The Esplande | Price On Request | 4902 7222

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 4 Atkin Avenue | Auction | 4904 8400

Stockton9.15am – 9.45am | 58 Forfar Street | Auction | 4955 6900

10.00am – 10.30am | 6 Pacific Street | Auction | 4955 6900

10.00am – 10.30am | 61A Mitchell Street | $640,000-$690,000 | 4928 4000

11.00am – 11.30am | 22 Queen Street | Auction | 4955 6900

11.45am – 12.15pm | 68 Hereford Street | Auction | 4955 6900

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 3 Clyde Street | Auction | 4902 7222

2.30pm – 3.00pm | 13 Booth Street | Auction 4 Nov 3pm | 0418 684 866

Swansea4.00pm – 4.30pm | 24/2 Belmont Street | $1,145,000 | 4945 8600

Tanilba Bay12.00pm – 12.30pm | 82 Avenue of the Allies | $349.000 | 0435865500

Teralba10.00am – 10.30am | 2 North Street | AUCTION | 4959 1677

11.30am – 12.00pm | 31 Railway Street | AUCTION | 4959 1677

The Hill10.00am – 10.30am | 7 Armitage Street | AUCTION | 0413 209 500

11.00am – 11.30am | 10/10 Kitchener Pde | $770,000 – $799,000 | 0402 009 532

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 5 Bingle Street | 1,375,000 – 1,475,00 | 0249 260 600

12.15pm – 12.45pm | 4/41 Nesca Parade | Guide $695,000 | 0249 260 600

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 20 Mosbri Crescent | $1.9mil – $2.1 | 02 4961 6899

The Junction10.00am – 10.30am | 9 Brien Street | Auction | 4902 7222

11.45am – 12.15pm | 149 Union Street | $600,000 – $625,000 | 0402 009 532

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 16/34 Kemp Street | $540,000 – $590,000 | 02 4961 6899

Tighes Hill10.30am – 11.00am | 9 Park Road | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

10.45am – 11.15am | 16 Union Street | $949,950 | 4908 5900

10.45am – 11.15am | 36 Kings Road | Auction 4 Nov 10:30 | 0418 682 377

Tingira Heights11.00am – 11.30am | 5 Somers Close | Guide $395,000 | 0249 260 600

3.00pm – 3.30pm | 20 Violet Town Road | EOI | 4945 8600

Toronto10.30am – 11.00am | 24 Peppertree Circuit | Preview | 0408 525 362

11.00am – 11.30am | 16 Thorne Street | $429,000 | 4959 1677

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 132 The Boulevarde | $465,000 – $490,000 | 4959 1466

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 4/78 Brighton Avenue | $545,000 | 4959 1466

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 27 Renwick Street | $725,000 | 4959 1677

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 6/124 Brighton Avenue | $379,000 | 4959 1677

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 4/126a Brighton Avenue | $395,000 | 4959 1677

Valentine10.00am – 10.30am | 41 Lurnea Avenue | AUCTION 02.11.17 | 4942 8377

10.00am – 10.30am | 20 Connaught Road | $730,000 – $750,000 | 0413 452 297

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 83 Connaught Road | AUCTION 02.11.17 | 4942 8377

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 64 Victor Avenue | EOI | 4908 5900

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 19 The Hill | $755,000 – $810,000 | 0249 260 600

Wallsend9.15am – 9.45am | 26 Murnin Street | Auction | 0418689815

9.15am – 9.45am | 22 Murnin Street | $480,000 to $520,000 | 4955 6900

10.15am – 10.45am | 63 Close Street | $484,950 | 4908 5900

11.00am – 11.30am | 10 Marie Street | $495,500 to $545,000 | 0418689815

11.00am – 11.30am | 1/65 Gunambi Street | $340,000 – $370,000 | 0439 616 851

11.45am – 12.15pm | 18 Abbott Street | $530,000 – $580,000 | 02 4961 6899

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 39A Macquarie Street | $460,000 to $500,000 | 4955 6900

12.15pm – 12.45pm | 2/7 Dorrigo Street | $450,000 – $470,000 | 0413 209 500

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 1/31 Hill Street | $390,000 to $420,000 | 4955 6900

1.00pm – 2.00pm | 25 Macquarie Street | $485,000 | 0425 290 322

1.45pm – 2.15pm | 49 Birchgrove Drive | $590,000 to $650,000 | 4955 6900

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 43 Stapleton Street | Price On Request | 4902 7222

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 1/75 Lake Road | $387,000 – $425,000 | 4957 6166

3.15pm – 3.45pm | 34 Birchgrove Drive | $740,000 – $800,000 | 4950 8555

Wangi Wangi10.00am – 10.30am | 8 Watkins Road | $480,000 – $510,000 | 4959 8667

12.30pm – 1.00pm | 16 Kummari Street | $569,000 | (02) 4975 4499

Warabrook10.00am – 10.30am | 1/19 Floribunda Circuit | Preview | 4908 5900

Waratah11.45am – 12.15pm | 18 High Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 8 Cyril Street | Auction | 4908 5900

2.15pm – 2.45pm | 8 Dulling Street | Guide on Request | 0249 260 600

Waratah West11.00am – 11.45am | 98 Lorna Street | $420000-$460000 | 4960 0499

Warners Bay10.00am – 1.00pm | 215/6 King Street | $699,000 | 4908 5900

10.00am – 1.00pm | 313/6 King Street | $589,000 | 4908 5900

10.00am – 10.30am | 27 Chartley Street | $639,000 – $659,000 | 4908 5900

10.00am – 1.00pm | 120/6 King Street | $389,000 | 4908 5900

10.00am – 10.30am | 24/48 Fairfax Road | $515,000 – $535,000 | 4908 5900

11.15am – 11.45am | 44 Warners Bay Road | $590,000 – $640,000 | 4904 8400

11.30am – 12.00pm | 1/31 Walker Street | Guide: $695,000 | 4904 8400

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 53 Warners Bay Road | Preview | 4908 5900

1.00pm – 1.30pm | 6 Hindmarsh Street | $870,000 – $930,000 | 0447 122 113

1.30pm – 2.00pm | 2 Jonathan Street | Auction | 4929 5999

2.00pm – 2.30pm | 87 Bayview Street | $500,000 – $550,000 | 4989 4003

Whitebridge10.30am – 11.00am | 5 Salway Close | $940,000 – $990,000 | 0413 437654

10.45am – 11.15am | 142/146 Dudley Road | Guide: $489,000 | 4904 8400

11.00am – 11.30am | 52 Bulls Garden Road | $850,000 – $935,000 | 4904 8400

11.00am – 11.30am | 2 Flora Close | $1,150,000 | 4929 5999

12.00pm – 12.30pm | 80 Lonus Ave | Auction | 4929 5999

Wickham11.00am – 11.30am | 2/28-30 Robert Street | $720,000-$735,000 | 0412 680 584

Windale12.30pm – 1.00pm | 124 Willandra Crescent | $340,000 | 4908 5900

Woodrising9.30am – 10.00am | 4 Columbia Close | $440,000 | 4975 4800

Yarrawonga Park1.00pm – 2.00pm | 62 Yoorala Road | $1,300,000 | (02) 4975 4499

October – the stock market’s friend, especially for banks

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – SEPTEMBER 22: Generic ‘Big Four Banks’ – ANZ Bank, Commonwealth Bank, NAB Bank and Commonwealth Bank. General view of people walking past bank atms on 22 September, 2015 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Paul Rovere/Fairfax Media) Generic banks”Everybody” knows October is the stock market crash month – except it’s not. This century, October has been the Australian market’s second-best performer.
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And “everybody” knows Australian banks are on the nose, shunned by the world, a whiff of sulphur about them. But they’re due for a bounce-back and should be the market’s top performers for the next little while.

Or so has written Bell Potter’s Richard Coppleson in his Coppo Report. Coppleson doesn’t write as a chartist, a mere graph-paper person, but based on the fundamentals of dividend flows and the reporting season for three of the Big Four next month.

The Coppo Report reckons investors, with their love of fat dividends, buy the banks ahead of their profit reports and going ex-dividend next month.

“Over the last 20-odd years I have seen it happen again and again – the only exceptions come when there is a big ‘global macro’ event that is causing markets to be hit across the globe,” Coppleson writes.

With the September reporting season over and the stocks paying their dividends into investors’ accounts, those investors go hunting with that cash for where they can next harvest dividends. Enter National Australia Bank, ANZ Banking Group and Westpac reporting in November. This is not just the self-managed super fund “army”.

“There are some funds that follow the dividends around and provide big distributions,” Coppleson says. “I know these funds will be buying the banks for their income. So what we see is a ‘rotation’ out of the stocks that have already paid dividends into the next ones that do.”

September saw $16.4 billion in dividends paid, with another $7.3 billion rolling out this month – $23.7 billion looking for a home after the banks have been sold off but just ahead of three of them being likely to announce $8.2 billion in dividends.

Coppleson explains that the “45-day rule” means retail investors must hold shares “at risk” for at least 45 days to be eligible for franking. The ex-dividend dates for the Big Three are roughly November 6 for the ANZ and NAB and November 14 for Westpac.

“I have seen quant studies done over the years that prove this, whereby the banks ‘outperform’ in the four weeks prior and two weeks post going ex-dividend (I have been quoting this number for 15 years and it seems to occur most times),” he writes.

The Coppo Report has been well followed for its experienced reading of dividend flows. It ignores the psychology of the open season declared on banks by the government in its attempt to negate Labor’s royal commission policy. I suggest this, too, will pass.

For all the headlines and failures, the fact remains that our banks are big, profitable, sound businesses paying very handsome dividends. The bank levy is barely a scratch.

Looking away from the doom-and-gloom merchants chasing headlines, the consensus view is building that the “brave” Treasury and Reserve Bank forecasts for the Australian economy over the next year could well come true. The International Monetary Fund is the latest mob to fall in line with predicting stronger growth next year.

And given the hunk of the Australian economy that our big banks are inextricably part of, that’s a positive for their outlook after the headlines die down.

Disclosure: The Pascoe family super fund holds bank shares, in keeping with just about every other Australian superannuation fund.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Two in three Australians think religion does more harm than good

A bigger share of Australians than respondents in most other countries think religion does more harm than good in the world, new polling has revealed.
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But we are also more comfortable with religious diversity than the international average.

The survey of more than 17,000 people across 23 countries by polling firm Ipsos found opinion is evenly divided about the influence that religion has in society.

It showed 49 per cent of respondents across all countries agreed with the statement “religion does more harm in the world than good”.

But the proportion of Australians agreeing with that statement was well above the international average at 63 per cent.

“Australia is one of the more negative countries regarding the perceived harm that religion does,” David Elliott from the Ipsos Social Research Institute said.

Only Belgium (68 per cent) had a higher proportion than Australia who agreed religion does more harm than good, while Germany and Spain were on par with Australia.

Even so, Australia had an above-average share who felt “completely comfortable” being around people with different religious beliefs to their own (84 per cent).

“While many of us do not have a positive view of religion, we are not translating this negativity to fear or dislike of individuals who have different beliefs to our own,” Mr Elliot said.

“In this regard, we are among the more tolerant nations globally. This tolerance may reflect our multi-cultural society or maybe driven by beliefs that negative impacts of religion are more an issue globally than locally.”

The 2016 census, released in July, found a record 29.6 per cent of Australians described themselves as having “no religion”, up from 22 per cent five years earlier, while a further 9.6 per cent did not state a religious affiliation.

Just over 60 per cent of the population identified with a religious faith on census night.

But the Ipsos Global @dvisor survey found only 27 per cent of Australians agreed with the statement “my religion defines me as a person”. That was well below the share of Americans agreeing with the statement (49 per cent) but higher than in Great Britain (23 per cent). Japan had the lowest share who felt religion defines them as a person (14 per cent).

International opinion was also split when it comes to the importance of religion to a nation’s “moral life”. Half of those across the 23 countries surveyed agreed with the statement “religious practices are an important factor in the moral life of my country’s citizens”. Only about four in 10 Australians concurred with that statement, a much smaller share than the two in three Americans who agreed.

One in six worldwide said that they “lose respect for people” after finding out that they are not religious. The share of Australian respondents sharing that sentiment was even smaller at one in eight.

In Australia, 25 per cent agreed that religious people make “better citizens”, a much lower share than in America (45 per cent) and Russia (44 per cent) and India (62 per cent). The international average agreeing that the religious make better citizens was 32 per cent.

Japan was least likely to think that religion does more harm than good in the world (26 per cent) followed by Russia and South Korea (both with 36 per cent).

The share in the United States who think religion does more harm than good in the world was also well below the international average at 39 per cent.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Counting on your super to fund your retirement? Don’t.

BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA – JANUARY 07: generic, retirement, seniors , pension, old age, superannuation, nest egg on January 7, 2016 in Brisbane, Australia. (Photo by Glenn Hunt/Fairfax Media)Australians make up barely 0.3 per cent of the world’s population and yet hold $2.1 trillion in pension savings — the world’s fourth-largest such pool. Those assets are viewed as a measure of the country’s wealth and economic resilience, and seem to guarantee a high standard of living for Australians well into the future.
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Other developed nations, aging even faster than Australia and subject to fraying safety nets, have held up the system as a world-class model to fund retirement. In fact, its future looks nowhere near so bright.

Australia’s superannuation scheme is a defined contribution pension plan funded by mandatory employer contributions (currently 9.5 per cent, scheduled to rise gradually to 12 per cent by 2025). Employees can supplement those savings and are encouraged to do so with tax breaks, pension fund earnings and generous benefits.

The gaudy size of the investment pool, however, masks serious vulnerabilities. First, the focus on assets ignores liabilities, especially Australia’s $1.8 trillion in household debt as well as total non-financial debt of around $3.5 trillion. It also overlooks the nation’s foreign debt, which has reached over 50 per cent of GDP — the result of the substantial capital imports needed to finance current account deficits that have persisted despite the recent commodity boom, strong terms of trade and record exports.

Second, the savings must stretch further than ever before, covering not just the income needs of retirees but their rapidly increasing healthcare costs. In the current low-income environment, investment earnings have shrunk to the point where they alone can’t cover expenses. That’s reducing the capital amount left to pass on as a legacy.

Third, the financial assets held in the system (shares, real estate, etc.) have to be converted into cash at current values when they’re redeemed, not at today’s inflated values. Those values are quite likely to decline, especially as a large cohort of Australians retires around the same time, driving up supply. Meanwhile, weak public finances mean that government funding for healthcare is likely to drop, forcing retirees to liquidate their investments faster and further suppressing values.

Fourth, the substantial size of these savings and the large annual inflow (more than $100 billion per year) into asset managers has artificially inflated values of domestic financial assets, given the modest size of Australia’s capital markets. As retirees increasingly draw down their savings, withdrawals may be greater than new inflows, reducing demand for these financial assets. This will be exacerbated by labour market changes, including lower job security and slower wage growth, which will reduce employee contributions into the scheme. Values, which depend on a growing pool of pension savings, will inevitably suffer.

Fifth, the system has accelerated the financialisation of the Australian economy. The large inflows and around 600,000 self-managed superannuation funds feed an industry of financial planners, asset managers, asset consultants, accountants, lawyers and custodians, as well as banks and stockbrokers. The more than $20 billion annually paid in fees and costs is of questionable economic value.

Finally, the system may well fail in its primary objective — that is, to minimise the need for the government to finance retirement. The typical accumulated balance at retirement age is around $200,000 for men and around $110,000 for women. The averages are artificially increased by a small pool of people with large balances, yet they’re still well below the $600,000 to $700,000 estimated to be necessary for homeowning and debt-free couples to finance their retirements, which may last 20 or more years.

The federal government will need to cover the shortfall for a large proportion of the population. In fact, it will lose doubly, having already suffered a loss of revenue from the generous tax breaks provided for the schemes (estimated at $30 billion annually and increasing), which have been used, especially by wealthy individuals, as a way to reduce their tax burden.

Future generations will also be affected adversely, having to finance payments to older generations through higher taxes or additional government debt, reduced wealth transfers from parents, and lower benefits than those awarded to their predecessors. Retirement out of reach for most

The whole system illustrates the fallacy of all retirement schemes, whether underwritten by governments, employers or by individuals themselves.

Such arrangements can only work in an environment of high incomes, strong investment returns and limited post-retirement life expectancy. Alternatively, they are sustainable where a rapidly rising population and workforce finance payments to a smaller group of post-retirement workers.

The real lesson of that experience may be that the idea of retirement is unrealisable for most workers, who will almost certainly have to work beyond their expected retirement dates if they want to sustain their lifestyles.

Governments have implicitly recognised this fact by abandoning mandatory retirement requirements, increasing the minimum retirement age, tightening eligibility criteria for benefits and reducing tax concessions for this form of saving.

If the world’s best pension system can’t succeed, we’re going to have to rethink retirement itself.

Satyajit Das is a former banker whose latest book is “A Banquet of Consequences.” He is also the author of “Extreme Money” and “Traders, Guns & Money.” He lives in Sydney.

Bloomberg

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Geelong an unlikely new home for Watts: Cats

Geelong are playing down their chances of landing Melbourne’s Jack Watts, claiming a deal for him remains unlikely to be done.
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While the Cats’ stance on Wednesday sent Watts a step closer to Port Adelaide, Fairfax Media understands Geelong could still be a player in the trade, depending on what compensation they receive for a departing Steven Motlop.

After Watts’ tour of the Cats’ facilities on Tuesday, which included meetings with coach Chris Scott and superstar Patrick Dangerfield, the race appeared to be down to two clubs.

While Geelong are still some hope of landing Watts, Port Adelaide are now firmly in the box seat.

Cats list manager Stephen Wells said at this stage they wouldn’t be able to compensate the Demons with a suitable trade.

“We’ve met with Jack as an information-gathering exercise and my conversations with both Jack, Paul Connors and also with the Melbourne Football Club, we’ve had to say at the moment that we’re unlikely to be able to do a deal for Jack to come to Geelong,” he told the league’s website.

“But that doesn’t mean we won’t see something change in that regard in the next week or so, but we haven’t offered Jack a contract at this stage.

“The main reason is because we don’t like to commit to a player as far as attracting them to Geelong unless we think we can get the deal done.

“We’ve had good conversations with Melbourne and Todd Viney has made it clear what they’d be expecting for Jack from us and at this stage we don’t think we’d be able to do that deal, so we’re not going to give Jack any false hope or waste anyone’s time.”

Geelong have picks 21 and 34 (after Brisbane received a compensation pick for Tom Rockliff) in the second round of the upcoming draft and at this stage remain unwilling to part with either of them in exchange for Watts.

That could change, however, if and when they receive a compensation pick for Motlop, which is likely to be either 22 or 35.

Fairfax Media understands that a decision about Watts’ preferred destination isn’t likely to be made public this week.

Sydney remain interested in the departing Demon, but the Swans would have to make room in their salary cap before entertaining a trade.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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